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I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Yangchuanosaur…

I Know Dino Podcast Episode 210 Yangchuanosaurus + 3 new dinosaurs

Episode 210 is all about Yangchuanosaurus, an Allosaurus-sized carnivore from the Jurassic of Sichuan, China.

Big thanks to all our patrons! Your support means so much to us and keeps us going! If you’re a dinosaur enthusiast, join our growing community on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino.

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Yangchuanosaurus – Episode 210

Dinosaur of the day Yangchuanosaurus, an Allosaurus-sized carnivore from the Jurassic of Sichuan, China.

In dinosaur news this week:

  • A New Ceratopsid Dinosaur, Crittendenceratops, was discovered in Arizona
  • A new Chinese titanosauriform, Liaoningotitan, was fortunately named the same as mounts that have already gone on display
  • Amphicoelias fragillimus was renamed Maraapunisaurus fragillimus after a reanalysis showed it wasn’t nearly as large as previously thought
  • A doctor in Texas got to keep his Tarbosaurus skull after a judge found that the US government took too long to file forfeiture paperwork
  • Two Medicine Dinosaur Center, in Bynum Montana, is building a Amphicoelias (now Maraapunisaurus) measuring 136ft long
  • The Natural History Museum of LA is getting the traveling exhibition Antarctic Dinosaurs on April 3

This episode is brought to you in part by TRX Dinosaurs, which makes beautiful and realistic dinosaur sculptures, puppets, and animatronics. Get a baby T. rex sculpture or other rewards by joining their Kickstarter! kck.st/2FRwB9p

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Yangchuanosaurus, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Yangchuanosaurus-Episode-210/

Check out this episode!

Beishanlong – Episode 209

Dinosaur of the day Beishanlong, the “North Mountains dragon” from Gansu China.

Interview with Jessie Atterholt, assistant professor at the Western University of Health Sciences. She’s also the lead author of the new paper “The most complete enantiornithine from North America and a phylogenetic analysis of the Avisauridae.” You can follow her on Instagram @theladyanatomica or jessieatterholt.com

In dinosaur news this week:

  • The smallest dinosaur footprints ever were discovered found in South Korea
  • Differences in Dilong and T. rex braincases show how tyrannosaurs changed as they evolved
  • The most complete North American enantiornithine, Mirarce, was found
  • Brian Engh recreated the new enantiornithine on a Utahceratops
  • Our holiday gift guide

This episode is brought to you in part by TRX Dinosaurs, which makes beautiful and realistic dinosaur sculptures, puppets, and animatronics. You can see some amazing examples and works in progress on Instagram @trxdinosaurs

And by Safari Ltd. All of their dinosaur toys are highly detailed, hand-painted, and thoroughly researched to be scientifically accurate. You can get 15% off all toys at safariltd.com by entering the promo code IKNOWDINO.

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Beishanlong, more links from our gift guide, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Beishanlong-Episode-209/

Check out this episode!

Crichtonpelta – Episode 208

Dinosaur of the day Crichtonsaurus/Crichtonpelta, a Chinese ankylosaur named after Jurassic Park author Michael Crichton.

Interview with Matt Celesky, Research associate at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science where he put together the excellent paleoart exhibit “Picturing the Past.” He is also the Senior exhibition designer for the museum resources division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. He can be found on Twitter @clepsydrops

In dinosaur news this week:

  • Crystal Palace Dinosaurs are raising money for a bridge to the Dinosaurs; Donate at spacehive.com/bridges-to-the-crystal-palace-dinosaurs
  • The new sauropod Lavocatisaurus agrioensis was named from 3 individuals found in an unlikely spot in Argentina
  • Court proceedings about the Dueling Dinosaurs gave us more information about the amazing find
  • An ornithopod bone was found in Oregon, despite it being underwater during the Mesozoic
  • A bone first thought to be coprolite turned out to be the first known tooth and vertebra of Parksosaurus from Mexico
  • Mary Anning is in contention to be on the new £50 note
  • A Google doodle recently honored famous Canadian paleontologist Joseph Tyrrell

This episode is brought to you in part by TRX Dinosaurs, which makes beautiful and realistic dinosaur sculptures, puppets, and animatronics. You can see some amazing examples and works in progress on Instagram @trxdinosaurs

And by Permia, makers of the coolest prehistoric clothing and collectibles this side of the Holocene! Their scientifically accurate t-shirts, hoodies, stickers, and figurines are available now at Permia.com Get $5 off orders of $35 or more using the promo code IKNOWDINO before the end of the year.

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Crichtonsaurus/Crichtonpelta, more links from Matt Celesky, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Crichtonpelta-Episode-208/

Check out this episode!

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Crichtonpelta …

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Crichtonpelta (Episode 208)

Episode 208 is all about Crichtonpelta, a Chinese ankylosaur named after Jurassic Park author Michael Crichton.

We also interview Matt Celesky, Research associate at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science where he put together the excellent paleoart exhibit “Picturing the Past.”He is also the Senior exhibition designer for the museum resources division of the New Mexico Department…

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Montanoceratops – Episode 207

Dinosaur of the day Montanoceratops, a primitive ceratopsian with an unusually deep tail thanks to its vertebral spines.

Interview with Ashley & Lee Hall, both from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Ashley is the Adult Programs Coordinator and Lee is a Preparator and Lab Manager. But more importantly, like us, their wedding heavily featured dinosaurs.

In dinosaur news this week:

  • T. rex could turn more quickly than similar dinosaurs
  • New histology on the tyrannosaurs Jane & Petey show that Nanotyrannus is probably a juvenile T. rex
  • Simulated jaw mechanics showed the bite force and bone penetration of several tyrannosaurs
  • The juvenile T. rex Found N.E. Montana includes partial hands, feet, vertebrae, ribs, a partial skull, and teeth
  • Therizinosaurs have an unusual combination of basal arm musculature and more avian style leg musculature
  • Dinosaurs’ unique single ovary appears to have evolved after Oviraptor but before Troodontidae
  • We don’t know if large bodied dromaeosaurs (velociraptor and larger) had tail fans
  • The new “Mtuka titanosaur” was found in Africa
  • An analysis of fossil fragments in Mygatt-Moore showed about half of the bones had marks on them
  • Maiasaura humeri bone microstructure changed as they aged, supporting a shift from bipedal to quadrupedal
  • Pachycephalosaurus has theropod-like teeth in the front and other similarities to Dracorex
  • An analysis of the pachycephalosaur Sphaerotholus showed that all 3 species should be considered valid
  • Early dinosaurs had thin semi rigid eggs, but in the early to mid Jurassic their eggs got thicker—possibly as a solution to dehydration and predation
  • By studying dozens of crocodilian, turtle, and bird nests, researchers found that the arrangement is preserved well as it is buried
  • Professional fossil preparator tips include: wear gloves, use tools only after getting training, and test other methods in advance to avoid unwanted destruction
  • High quality photogrammetry and 3D printing can be achieved using cheaper equipment
  • It is important to standardize and clean up the large amounts of historical fossil data so that it is easy to search and understand

This episode is brought to you in part by TRX Dinosaurs, which makes beautiful and realistic dinosaur sculptures, puppets, and animatronics. You can see some amazing examples and works in progress on Instagram @trxdinosaurs

And by Permia, makers of the coolest prehistoric clothing and collectibles this side of the Holocene! Their scientifically accurate t-shirts, hoodies, stickers, and figurines are available now at Permia.com Get $5 off orders of $35 or more using the promo code IKNOWDINO before the end of the year.

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Montanoceratops, more links from Ashley & Lee Hall, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Montanoceratops-Episode-207/

Check out this episode!

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Zuniceratops (…

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Zuniceratops (Episode 206)

Episode 206 is all about Zuniceratops, a ceratopsian that was discovered in New Mexico by an 8 year-old.

We also interview Jingmai O’Connor, professor at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences who recently described the first ever fossilized dinosaur lung remains

Big thanks to all our patrons! Your support means so much to us and keeps us…

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Zuniceratops – Episode 206

Dinosaur of the day Zuniceratops, a ceratopsian that was discovered in New Mexico by an 8 year-old.

Interview with Jingmai O’Connor, professor at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences who recently described the first ever fossilized dinosaur lung remains.

In dinosaur news this week:

  • A 130 million year old fossil from Hebei Province in China has been found
  • The “Baofenglong fossil” recently went on display at Chongqing Yongchuan Museum Town Hall in China. An 80% complete 49 ft (15 m) long herbivore
  • Residents near the Tumbler Ridge Museum voted to fund the museum with added attractions and services
  • Most sauropod fossils are from adults. Dwarf sauropods have a younger distribution, but still mostly adults
  • Several models of Yi qi extra wrist bone were proposed to find an orientation that may have worked with its patagial membranes
  • Flight evolution can be categorized into 4 evolutionary phases: characters unrelated to flight, exapted traits, direct selection, and traits for longer flight duration
  • Pterosaurs and maniraptorans couldn’t assume a bat-like pose
  • Microraptor & Rahonavis could glide, Changyuraptor used it’s tail for pitch control, but troodontids were too big (relative to their wings) to get off the ground
  • Ichthyornis has a skull half way between Archaeopteryx and modern birds
  • “Birds are the only group of animals that rival mammals in terms of brain size”
  • Sauropod trackway “gauge” might not mean much
  • A synchrotron of coprolite from an early dinosaur like Silesaurus opelensis showed lots of beetle remains including wings & beetle tibia
  • Based on carbon-13 isotopes in Deinonychus and Tenontosaurus it appears that raptors were not pack hunters
  • Thanks to guinea fowl walking through soft mud we are closer than ever to recreate how dinosaurs made their tracks
  • The pectoralis of Archaeopteryx was smaller than modern birds, but may have still been large enough to achieve brief flight
  • A study of Psittacosaurus braincases shows that 2 year-old brains elongate significantly (midbrain & olfactory tract/bulbs especially)
  • Ugrunaaluk was smaller than its massive cousins like Edmontosaurus, possibly because of dwarfism from living in the arctic reaching about 18-19ft long
  • A new ceratopsian was found in Grand staircase Escalante National Monument

This episode is brought to you in part by TRX Dinosaurs, which makes beautiful and realistic dinosaur sculptures, puppets, and animatronics. You can see some amazing examples and works in progress on Instagram @trxdinosaurs

And by Permia, makers of the coolest prehistoric clothing and collectibles this side of the Holocene! Their scientifically accurate t-shirts, hoodies, stickers, and figurines are available now. Get $5 off orders of $35 or more with the promo code IKNOWDINO

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Zuniceratops, more links from Jingmai O’Connor, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Zuniceratops-Episode-206/

Check out this episode!

Yamaceratops – Episode 205

Dinosaur of the day Yamaceratops, a ceratopsian whose frill is heavily pitted, possibly for jaw muscle attachments.

Interview with Ali Nabavizadeh, Assistant Professor of anatomy at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University. He studies the jaw musculature of herbivorous dinosaurs. Follow him on Twitter @Vert_Anatomist and check out his blog Anatomist’s Guide.

In dinosaur news this week:

  • A large sauropod from the Late Cretaceous has been found in the Gobi Desert and it’s about 30-40% complete
  • In Argentina 70 million year old dinosaur eggs were found possibly including embryos, skin, and teeth
  • The “Tufts-Love” T. rex skull at the Burke Museum has found 100% of the skull and jaw bones by bone count including several that are rarely preserved
  • Junchang Lü, one of the most prominent paleontologists in China, recently passed away at the beginning of October at the age of 53
  • Chilesaurus diegosuarezi, the first Jurassic dinosaur found in Chile, is going on exhibit at the Regional Museum of Aysen, in Coyhaique, Chile, next year
  • An Allosaurus will be posed with a nest at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History since it may have looked after its young
  • Jurassic World is selling Indoraptor masks, just in time for Halloween
  • A study of 150 Ceolophysis—mostly from the same bonebed—show that early triassic dinosaurs had femora that changed significantly as they aged
  • The data used to support the Ornithoscelida hypothesis had many errors, which casts some doubt on the conclusion that Ornithoscelida should replace the traditional Saurischia and Ornithischia groups
  • A study of a baby Massospondylus and it’s forelimb strength shows that Massospondylus was bipedal for its entire life
  • A simulation of Mussaurus (the earliest Jurassic sauropodomorph) showed its center of mass shifted as it grew, meaning that it was quadrupedal as a baby and bipedal as an adult
  • Researchers used a program called niche mapper to model microclimates of Plateosaurus & Coelophysis, showing which environments they would prefer based on plumage and metabolic rates
  • Reconstructions of dinosaur feeding musculature shows that they chewed in a way different than any animal alive today
  • A study of emu and ostrich bones found many similarities with dinosaurs and suggests using bone microstructure to identify maturity
  • Sauropodomorph inner ears vary significantly across groups: Diplodocoids have relatively smaller inner ear, while Giraffatitan has the largest known inner-ear
  • By studying alligator and turkey arms we might be able to show which theropods could supinate their hands as they drew them to their body
  • A study of dinosaur bearing sites from Dinosaur Park Formation in Alberta & Saskatchewan and the similar aged Judith River sites in Montana shows which locations were the most similar
  • A new model of dinosaur diversity in the latest cretaceous shows that they were not in decline, but instead maybe slowing down or leveling off

This episode is brought to you in part by TRX Dinosaurs, which makes beautiful and realistic dinosaur sculptures, puppets, and animatronics. You can see some amazing examples and works in progress on Instagram @trxdinosaurs

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Yamaceratops, more links from Ali Nabavizadeh, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Yamaceratops-Episode-205/

Check out this episode!

Coelophysis – Episode 204

Dinosaur of the day Coelophysis, the state dinosaur of New Mexico which has been found in huge groups.

In dinosaur news this week:

  • Dynamoterror dynastes “powerful terror ruler,” was described from the Menefee Formation in NW New Mexico

This episode is brought to you in part by TRX Dinosaurs, which makes beautiful and realistic dinosaur sculptures, puppets, and animatronics. You can see some amazing examples and works in progress on Instagram @trxdinosaurs

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Coelophysis, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Coelophysis-Episode-204/

Check out this episode!