Category: geology

cloudair:Rocks & Sky at Navajo Nation Land…

cloudair:

Rocks & Sky at Navajo Nation Land

Permian and Triassic Fossiliferous Formations

cloudair:Marine rocks from 75 million years ag…

cloudair:

Marine rocks from 75 million years ago

Portrush Chalk. Ulster White Limestone Group

An illustration i did this week for our sign o…

An illustration i did this week for our sign on the principle of “Hardness” in our upcoming geology exhibit at the Ogden Natural History Museum! It’s going to be so rad, guys.

The hand is my buddy Jeff, and the chisel is actually a doctor’s bone chisel we found in the paleo-lab. It looked scary, so we figured it would make a good visual 🙂

pbsdigitalstudios: The study of natural histor…

pbsdigitalstudios:

The study of natural history is the study of how the world has changed but Earth itself is in a constant state of flux – because the ground beneath your feet is always moving. 

So if we want to know how we got here, we have to understand how “here” got here. New from Eons!

Yeah, so you know what’s weird? Earth’s face.

It’s a pretty face and everything, but it’s changed A LOT over the past few billion years. More than we knew even a few years ago.

Check this out, and you’ll see what I mean!

The Giants – Part 10/11

The Giants – Part 10/11

Titanomyrma – a Paleogene ant the size of a hummingbird. Well, the queen could grow to the size of a hummingbird, i.e. around 6 cm. Worker ants of this genus are yet to be discovered in full. Members of this genus have been found in the Green River Formation in Wyoming and the Messel Shales of Germany. 

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Image Credit: U. Kiel 2011

cloudair:Gate to Cretaceous Portrush Chalk. …

cloudair:

Gate to Cretaceous

Portrush Chalk.  Ulster White Limestone Group

The Giants – Part 9/11

The Giants – Part 9/11

Saurophthirus – at 2.5 cm long, Saurophthirus is not actually very big. But when you realise that Saurophthirus was a flea (!) from the Cretaceous that fed on the blood of dinosaurs and pterosaurs… it kind of changes your perspective. Saurophthirus was the largest flea to have ever existed (for reference, extant fleas can grow up to 2.5 millimetres). Although I don’t know an estimate for how high they could jump, their long legs suggest that like their extant descendants, they were also very good jumpers. 

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Image Credit: T. Gao & team 2013

The Giants – Part 8/11

The Giants – Part 8/11

Inoceramus – an extinct genus of bivalves that originated in the Jurassic, within which is the subgenus, Platyceramus, aka. the largest bivalves of all time. They could reach up to 3 m wide, meaning they could grow considerably larger than the giant clam (Tridacna) which is know to grow up to 1.14 m. 

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Image Source: [X]

The Giants – Part 6/11

The Giants – Part 6/11

Meganeuropsis – a Permian griffinfly with a wingspan of ~70 cm, and the largest known insect of all time. As kind of discussed here, it is thought that insects were able to grow so large in the Permian due to the increased oxygen in the atmosphere. Earth Archives have a great article about them (with some cool artwork). 

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Image Credit: M. Sloan & N. Fletcher 2007

invert-palaeo: Arthropleura – a genus of mil…

invert-palaeo:

Arthropleura – a genus of millipedes from the Carboniferous. These guys are some of the largest land invertebrates to have ever existed, and likely had no predators. Despite their size, Arthropleura were lovely herbivores.

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Image Credit: N. Tamura 2015

The Giants – Part 5/11

I am recycling an old post again because Arthropleura is arguably the coolest of the Carboniferous invertebrates, and because I have been thinking about myriapods ever since this morning when I was asked to do myriapod evolution next and I am now really excited for that!