Category: dinosaurs

I Know Dino Podcast Episode 258: Coprolite (fossilized poop) with Karen Chin. Plus coverage of #2019SVP Day 3

Episode 258 is all about Anserimimus, The “goose mimic” from the Gobi Desert.

We also interview Karen Chin, Associate Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder and Curator of Paleontology at the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, and she’s an expert in coprolites. Check out a video of her work here if you want to see more.

Big thanks to all our…

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Dinosaur of the day Anserimimus, The “goose mimic” from the Gobi Desert.

Interview with Karen Chin, Associate Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder and Curator of Paleontology at the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, and she’s an expert in coprolites. Check out a video of her work here if you want to see more.

Get our new book 50 Dinosaur Tales at: bit.ly/50dinosaurtales

In dinosaur news this week:

  • News from the 3rd day of talks at the 2019 meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology
    • Dinosaurs had many different skull, jaw muscle, and brain sizes, but we can only easily study the small group that survived the mass extinction
    • By using evo-devo we can now see how exactly bird skulls form around their brains
    • Non-avian Dinosaurs quickly evolved many different skulls and jaws, but they don’t always reflect their feeding strategies
    • We don’t see evidence of dinosaurs before the Carnian Pluvial Event, but fossil localities are limited
    • A new statistical approach may make it easier to separate male and female dinosaur fossils
    • Some quadrupedal dinosaurs had much larger hindfeet than front-feet, but the reason is still unclear
    • Massospondylus had very flexible growth rates, possibly indicating it was a “recovery taxa” taking advantage of the end Triassic extinction
    • New Triceratops excavations found rare remains beyond just the skull, allowing us to measure how they changed as they grew
    • Late cretaceous ceratopsian brains changed shape to allow for the massive neck muscles they needed to hold up their head
    • Australia has the best ankylosaurs from Gondwana including the new “Julia Creek” specimen
    • A new, larger, Liaoningosaurus fossil was found by a farmer in China
    • Microstructure of pachycephalosaur domes may show that they did but heads
  • In Casper, Wyoming, the Tate Geological Museum now has Nicole the Torosaurus on display
  • The Natural History Museum in London is taking student applications to study ceratopsian phylogeny
  • Austria is releasing a set of 12 glow in the dark 3-euro dinosaur coins
  • Mattel Films is partnering with Daniel Kaluuya’s production company to make a live action Barney the dinosaur movie
  • Jurassic World 3 will star DeWanda Wise and Mamoudou Athie, and will bring back characters Ian Malcolm, Ellie Sattler, and Alan Grant will be in the film

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Anserimimus, links from Karen Chin, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Anserimimus-Episode-258/

Check out this episode!

“Research team documents new discovery of dinosaur relative” https://ift.tt/2BXuD2E

Dryptosaurus, Hadrosaurus, Mosasaurus, and Elasmosaurus, 1877, by Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins

Dinosaur of the day Kritosaurus, a hadrosaur that was found over 100 years ago in New Mexico.

Interview with Scott Hartman, a paleo artist and lecturer at the University of Wisconsin, Madison for the Department of Integrative Biology. He’s done hundreds of skeletal drawings and his work has been featured in books, museums, and academic publications. Follow him on facebook or twitter @skeletaldrawing or skeletaldrawing.com

In dinosaur news this week:

  • News from poster sessions and 2nd day of talks at the 2019 meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology
    • Early Mesozoic herbivores filled in ecological niches that were left because of extinctions
    • Regurgitalites (fossilized vomit) are out there, and they can give just as much information as coprolites (fossilized poop)
    • Chemical testing of bones is looking to be a promising method of finding lost fossil localities
    • Scott Hocknull described three successful case studies of getting the public involved with dinosaur discoveries during construction projects and mining operations
    • Stuart Sumida showed an animation of evolution, using a Dimetrodon and other relatives
    • Ariel Marcy has a new collaborative game about the scientific method, similar to the game Pandemic
    • Taissa Rodrigues taught high schoolers in Brazil about evolution through paleo art
    • Emanuel Tschopp found that sauropods from the Morrison Formation did not overlap as much as previously thought
  • Kayleigh Wiersma showed that some sauropods may have had beaks in addition to their teeth
  • Les Hearn and Amanda Williams published a paper about pain in dinosaurs, and found a lot of dinosaurs survived injuries that would have hurt their mobility and ability to hunt or run away from predators
  • The Field Museum in Chicago has new sensory stations, including one where you can smell Sue the T. rex’s breath
  • There’s a grassroots effort in Westchester New York to protect land with dinosaur tracks and fossils
  • Austin, Texas, as a weird neon green dinosaur, known as Mangiasaurus rex
  • Special Spaces Cleveland and the Jurassic World Live tour worked together to design a dinosaur bedroom for Ezra Boggs, a 6-year-old with cancer
  • Lego has a new 910 piece Dinosaur Fossils set

Get our merchandise, on sale for Halloween at bit.ly/iknowdinostore

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Kritosaurus, links from Scott Hartman, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Kritosaurus-Episode-257/

Check out this episode!

Episode 257: Interview with @skeletaldrawing about his skeletal drawings… Plus, regurgitalites, sauropods with beaks, dinosaur outreach, and other news from Day 2 of #2019SVP

Episode 257 is all about Kritosaurus, a hadrosaur that was found over 100 years ago in New Mexico.

We also interview Scott Hartman, a paleo artist and lecturer at the University of Wisconsin, Madison for the Department of Integrative Biology. He’s done hundreds of skeletal drawings and his work has been featured in books, museums, and academic publications. Follow him on facebook or twitter…

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Megalosaurus, Hylaeosaurus, Iguanodon, Teleosaurus, and Pterodactylus, 1877, by Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins

Iguanodon,
1912

Megalosaurus 1994

Stegosaurus,
1912