Three Spectacular Stegosaurs and Research Cast…

Dinosaur of the day Charonosaurus, a Chinese Parasaurolophus relative named after the ferryman from the river Styx.

Interview with Peter May, founder and Owner of Research Casting International. They mounted Sue, Stan, & the Nation’s T. rex. As well as Zuul, Patagotitan, and countless other amazing dinosaurs around the world.

In dinosaur news this week:

  • The new dinosaur Adratiklit boulahfa is the oldest known stegosaur and the first from Northern Africa
  • Two new stegosaur specimens were fround in Montana from the Morrison Formation
  • Researchers at the Museum für Naturkunde modeled their Giraffatitan and found new potential uses for sauropod tails
  • In Tibet, Xing Lida and a research team started a two-week expedition to study some recently found dinosaur footprints
  • A team of researchers in Utah are excavating seven Diplodocus vertebrae, destined for the new LANHM welcome center
  • Jurassic Outpost posted about updates coming to the Jurassic World Live show
  • The Disney Channel is getting the animated series Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur
  • Eurogamer has a fun list of games with dinosaurs
  • Turns out Google’s main office has a Stan the T. rex

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Charonosaurus, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Charonosaurus-Episode-249/

Check out this episode!

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Charonosaurus …

I Know Dino Podcast Episode 249: Garret visits RCI to get an update on their latest #dinosaur work. Plus the new #stegosaurus relative Adratiklit boulahfa.

Episode 249 is all about Charonosaurus, a Chinese Parasaurolophus relative named after the ferryman from the river Styx.

We also interview Peter May, founder and Owner of Research Casting International. They mounted Sue, Stan, & the Nation’s T. rex. As well as Zuul, Patagotitan, and countless other amazing dinosaurs around the world.

Big thanks to all our patrons! Your support means so much…

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Today’s museum news: “Lonnie Bunch, the …

Today’s museum news: “Lonnie Bunch, the Smithsonian’s first black leader, on the challenge of making it ‘a place that matters’” https://ift.tt/2Uji89X

“Reconstruction of oviraptorid clutches …

“Reconstruction of oviraptorid clutches illuminates their unique nesting biology – Acta Palaeontologica Polonica” https://ift.tt/2NMQAsp

Brontosaurus

Brontosaurus

antediluvianechoes: Moschops, Benjamin Chandle…

antediluvianechoes:

Moschops, Benjamin Chandler, 2014

Barrel-bodied and buck-toothed, he was not an attractive king. But his markings were strong, with bright stripes on his flanks and face, and in shoving matches he was undefeated. For these reasons, the pod followed him, the females welcoming, the other males submissive. His domain extended from the wood, through the meadow, to the edge of the lake country where anteosaurs lurked.

They were not alone. Bands of snorting Jonkeria, like lizard-pigs, strolled through the region, huffing and grunting, gnawing on pieces of dead things left near the forest, or harvesting the more delectable parts of weeds and roots. Little gorgonopsids, reptiles-cum-foxes, hopped through the underbrush, pulling amphibians from puddles or tails from lizards. They only needed to be watched during egg-laying season, when an unmonitored nest would lure them from their critter-catching games.

He had just one blemish: a scar on his right foreleg, a souvenir from a Titanosuchus attack three summers before. The hatchlings had grown into calves, mewling things that waddled indiscriminately between adults. They were mostly his children, though a few males had snuck quick screws with willing cows behind his back. The offspring of these pairings smelled different to him, unwelcome. He did not protect them. But his own kin he monitored with proud diligence. 

Uneasy sounds came from the edge of the pod. The Titanosuchus—a cougar in monitor lizard’s clothing—had slunk from the wood. It padded around the small herd, dragged tail shushing against foliage, fangs glistening in the evening light. The pod knew that the predator would never attack a full-grown Moschops, but a juvenile was manageable and tempting. The calves were nudged by adults to the far side of the herd, then nudged again when the therapsid circled around. 

The monarch followed the Titanosuchus, keeping step with the reptile-thing’s patrol. He hummed a warning, a deep tone that rolled from the chest. The predator replied with nothing, the only sounds it made were its body moving through the vegetation. 

A small window in the pod allowed a baying juvenile—one of the monarch’s own—to wander into the open. The Titanosuchus darted, and the monarch bolted after it, head low, feet stomping. The two clashed before the one could catch the calf, the Moschops’s bony head nearly flipping the puma-lizard while a heavy foot came down and cracked one of the predator’s ribs. The Titanosuchus hissed, yelped, wheeled with its mouth agape. One tusk sliced a gash on the monarch’s leg, deep enough to bleed, but not deep enough to debilitate. The Moschops steamrollered the predator again, and the Titanosuchus fled. 

The rest of the day his leg pinched when he walked. It would take some time for the gash to heal, but it did, leaving a shiny hair-thin line between the black scutes on his leg, the origin of which the Moschops king would never remember.

“Testing the function of dromaeosaurid (…

“Testing the function of dromaeosaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) ‘sickle claws’ through musculoskeletal modelling and optimization” https://ift.tt/2HupP87

The new grey skulled sauropodomorph and Missio…

Dinosaur of the day Polacanthus, an ankylosaur that was described in the 1800s, but no one is sure who named it.

In dinosaur news this week:

  • After decades of being classified as Massospondylus, “grey skull” has a new name, Ngwevu intloko
  • Mission Jurassic in North Wyoming could hold over 100 dinosaurs in one square mile
  • A group of juvenile hadrosaurs was found at Pipestone Creek, near the Philip J. Currie Museum
  • The Scottish government is working on better protecting the fossils on the Isle of Skye in Scotland
  • In India, a group of scientists are pushing for a bill that will designate and safeguard fossil sites
  • In Romania, new dinosaur nests have been found, most likely from a hadrosaur like Telmatosaurus
  • The Natural History Museum in London has digitized their holotype of Mantellisaurus
  • The Central Museum of Mongolian Dinosaurs recently opened a new exhibition hall, themed Paleozoic Era
  • Dinosaur Park in Laurel, Maryland has an open house this summer, on September 7
  • Trix the T.rex is back in Leiden, at the updated Naturalis Biodiversity Center in the Netherlands
  • A new project called “On the Trail of Dinosaurs,” will bring the Dinosaur Tracks from the Australian Dampier Peninsula to life
  • children visiting the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences regularly try to help the injured sauropod, giving it hugs and Band-Aids.
  • South Dakota rancher Kenny Brown recently retired and bequeathed his 1,330 acre ranch to the School of Mines
  • PLOS One blog has a list of events for National Fossil Day in the US (October 16)
  • On August 29, the US Postal Service is issuing four new T. rex stamps, with a holographs
  • Nickelodeon has a new animated series coming out September 14, LEGO Jurassic World: Legend of Isla Nubar

To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino

For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Polacanthus, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Polacanthus-Episode-248/

Check out this episode!

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Polacanthus (E…

I Know Dino Podcast Episode 248: The new sauropodomorph Ngwevu intloko from South Africa and tons of other news.

Episode 248 is all about Polacanthus, an ankylosaur that was described in the 1800s, but no one is sure who named it.

Big thanks to all our patrons! Your support means so much to us and keeps us going! If you’re a dinosaur enthusiast, join our growing community on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino.

You can listen to our free podcast, with all our episodes, on Apple Podcasts at:

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gameraboy1:

gameraboy1:

The Exciting World of Dinosaurs
Sinclair Dinoland, New York World’s Fair, 1964-65